November is Picture Book Month, an international literacy initiative that celebrates print picture books during the month November.  I am a picture book fanatic.  I love picture books so much that I recently wrote my own called The Legend of Dust Bunnies, a Fairy’s Tale.   To celebrate Picture Book Month, and the launch of my very first book, I am giving away 15 FREE copies on Goodreads

Throughout the month of November, I’ll post tips, links, and articles pertaining to my favorite genre.  I hope you’ll discover something to enhance your family’s shared reading experiences.

I think sharing picture books is one of the most loving gifts a parent can bestow upon a child.  The good news is that it doesn’t take any special training to read aloud with your child.  If you are reading with your child, you are doing it right!  The great thing about picture books is that everyone, no matter how busy, can set aside 5-10 minutes a night to share a picture book.  There is no better way to unplug from a hectic day than getting lost in a good story. Creating a daily or nightly ritual of reading with your child is powerful way to connect with each other. I’ll get into this in greater depth in a forthcoming post, but parents should NOT stop reading picture books to their children when they become independent readers. Children should be allowed to continue to enjoy this sacred time with you. My son is almost nine, and we still come home with a heaping bag of library books each week, and they are all picture books. He reads chapter books at school and at home, but picture book time, is OUR time. Sometimes I read with him, and other times my husband takes the lead. But we never go to bed without at least one picture book story. Okay, now I’ll come down from my soap box and share some practical advice for getting the most out of your read-together time.

Here are a few articles I found interesting:

http://rochester.kidsoutandabout.com/content/picture-books-why-not-rush-your-kids-out-them/

http://www.thechildrensbookreview.com/weblog/2010/11/how-picture-books-play-a-role-in-a-child%E2%80%99s-development.html

http://www.rif.org/us/literacy-resources/articles/getting-the-most-out-of-picture-books.htm

The following suggestions and additional resources can be found at http://www.readingrockets.org/article/read-aloud-daily-practical-ideas-parents/

Read Aloud Daily: Practical Ideas for Parents

By: Texas Education Agency

When children hear books read aloud, they come to understand why learning to read is important. They learn that people read for different reasons – books that tell a story can be read for pleasure; books full of facts and information can be read in order to learn new things. Children learn a great deal when they listen to books read aloud – they hear new words, learn new ways of saying things, and are introduced to new ideas, different people, and faraway places

When reading a book with your children, you can:

  • Let them hold the book and turn the pages.
  • Talk about different parts of the book such as the front, back, title page, first page, and last page.
  • Take your time reading. Do not rush.
  • Point to the words as you read. Help them to see that there are spaces between words, that you read from the top of the page to the bottom, and that you read from left to right.
  • Ask them to think about the story as you read it.
  • Point to the pictures and talk about them.
  • Read expressively: talk the way the story’s characters would talk; make sound effects and funny faces; and vary the pitch of your voice throughout the story to make it more interesting.
  • Encourage them to ask questions about the story’s characters and events.
  • Talk about the story and relate it to their personal experiences.

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